EP 70 WF Kenya Coviak: Conjuring Detroit

In this episode Risa talks to Detroit Witch and organizer Kenya Coviak. As helicopters fly overhead and the pandemic rages outside her doors, Kenya takes us on a magical memory tour of Detroit in all its diverse powers. Founder of the Detroit Conjure and Folk Magic Festival (as well as organizer of many other Witch…

EP 69 MW Margaret Murray: What Science Calls Nature and Religion Calls God

An archeologist before there were any.  The point of origin for the idea that witches gather in covens. The mother of all subsequent covens, in a way. The first woman to unwrap a mummy. Author of ”The Witch-Cult in Western Europe”. Criticized for her cognitive leaps, discredited for the way she pieced through sources choosing…

Missing Witches Merch Store

Well it’s official, we’ve joined the ranks of many of our podcasting peers over on TeePublic! We wanted an ethical way to make it easy for our beautiful coven of listeners to get your hands on Missing Witches gear (sweatshirts! mugs! notebooks!) TeePublic reached out to us and answered all our questions, and we feel…

EP 64 Witches Found – Yvonne Chireau: Black Magic

In this episode Risa talks with Dr. Yvonne Chireau, Professor of Religion and Chair at Swathmore College, and author of Black Magic: Religion and the African American Conjuring Tradition. Follow along with her thoughtful work on Africana Religions at https://academichoodoo.com/

Missing Witches Book

Our Missing Witches book is now available for Pre-Order. “A guide to invocations, rituals, and histories at the intersection of magic and feminism, as informed by history’s witches–and the sociopolitical culture that gave rise to them. When you start looking for witches, you find them everywhere. As seekers and practitioners reclaim and restore magic to…

EP 63 Missing Witches – Dihya al Kahina: A Free and Noble Witch

This episode honours a 7th Century hero. A Black indigenous Woman who was a leader. A warrior priestess named Dihya, champion of the native North African Amazigh people, her name means “the beautiful gazelle” in the Tamazight language of the Amazigh. Amazigh, plural Imazighen, means “free or noble people” in the Indigenous Tamazight language. Among…